Google’s Project Glass Will Change The World

Earlier this year, it was revealed that Google was working on a special pair of glasses – glasses with a built-in camera, display, and interface of some sort – like a wearable smartphone. Eventually, we learned that this was being called ‘Project Glass‘, and now we’ve seen dozens upon dozens of people wearing it, as well as content being posted online (mostly photos) taken by Project Glass.

It wasn’t until earlier this month, however, at Google I/O, that we really got an idea of just how epic this product is going to be, and a sneak peak at how much it’s going to change the world. At Google I/O, Google pulled off the most awe-inspiring demo of these glasses. They did a live demo of someone wearing Project Glass while on a Google Hangout (like a video call), skydiving and landing on Moscone Center, where Google I/O was taking place. They showed the livestream onscreen in Moscone, even while the jumpers were in the air. They landed on the roof, rapelled down the side of the building, and then rode BMX bicycles up onto stage – again, all while livestreaming video so that all the attendees were seeing the demo from the skydivers’ POV. A-freakin-mazing. You can watch that demo here.

However, that’s obviously an extreme example. What about something that actually shows Project Glass as part of your real life? Here’s the video demo of that:

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZDirHMEmXk

This is something I can immediately relate to. It IS nearly impossible to get great photos of your kids, especially as babies. And yes, my daughter also had ‘stage fright’ when I thrust a camera into her face (even the camera on my phone).

We still have some time before this is here, though. Attendees at Google I/O will be the first to get a pair of Project Glass (or whatever the go-to-market name is), provided they live in the U.S. and had $1,500 to spare last week. Even then, they won’t receive them until next year – at least 6 months from now, possibly longer.

How much would you be willing to pay for what’s essentially a wearable smartphone?

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